Cemetery History
The carved stones in Montpelier’s cemeteries are daily reminders of those who came before and helped lay the foundation and character of this city. These original, historic, and artistic artifacts reveal some of the personalities of Montpelier’s past citizens, tell part of their story, and provide a window on the era in which they lived. As places of reverence and reflection, and as destinations for people interested in local history, family history, art, and craftsmanship, Montpelier’s cemeteries should continue to be maintained and preserved. There are three cemeteries  located in Montpelier.

Green Mount Cemetery
Green Mount, established in 1854, is the largest Montpelier cemetery, located on 35 acres across from the Winooski River on Lower State Street. The Chapel-Vault building was erected in 1905 from a generous bequest of John E. Hubbard.
Statue of Margaret
The terraced landscape includes 2.5 miles of curved roads, many pleasant shade trees and ornamental shrubs, and numerous sculptural works which are not only memorials to the departed, but also to the talents of our area's artisans both past and present. Areas for expansion exist to the west. At the northwestern end of the cemetery, a new area is being developed into the woods with areas for cremation, in-ground burials, and mausoleums.

Elm Street Cemetery
This historic cemetery, located between 189 and 213 Elm Street, is relatively small and is likely the oldest of the city's three cemeteries. It is no longer in use and many stones are missing or in need of repair. Several interesting slate stones can be found among those that still remain. Though no one seems to claim ownership, the cemetery is maintained by the Cemetery Commission.

St. Augustine’s Catholic Cemetery
Tucked on one of Montpelier’s hillsides off of Lincoln Avenue, the terraces of St. Augustine’s Catholic Cemetery offer a unique view of the city. It is owned and maintained by St. Augustine's Church. Its capacity and future space needs are currently unknown.