Hubbard Park

Hubbard Park is our largest and one of our most popular parks. Along with Summer Street Park, it became the first Montpelier Park lands in 1899. This park is over 200 acres. It includes more than 7 miles of hiking and skiing trails, 2 picnic shelters, numerous picnic areas, a soccer and ball field, a small pond, a sledding hill, and a 54-foot stone observation tower. See the links at left for Park Rules, history and how to reserve a shelter.

See the park map for information on trails, access and permitted uses.

Thank you for not leaving trash in the park. 

Carry out whatever you carry in. 

Take only pictures, leave only footprints.

Park Features

Old Shelter Pavilion

Located on top of a grassy hill with a beautiful view, the Old Shelter is near a combined soccer and softball field and, in the winter months, right next to the Sledding Hill. This shelter includes picnic tables, a water fountain and a grill. There is also a composting toilet nearby. This shelter is not handicapped accessible. If you plan to use it without making a reservation, please check the reservation wall in the shelter to make sure it has not already been reserved.


New Shelter Pavilion

Nestled in the heart of Hubbard Park, the New Shelter is handicapped accessible and a bit more shaded than the Old Shelter. A composting toilet stands right across the road, and the lawn is large enough for some games or for children to run around. There are also several picnic tables, a grill and a water fountain. If you plan to use it without making a reservation, please check the reservation wall in the shelter to make sure it has not already been reserved.


Seven Fireplaces

In a hidden glen in the middle of the forest are the Seven Fireplaces of Hubbard Park. This spot features at least one picnic table, a grill, and a scenic composting toilet. Visitors are also allowed to build campfires in the fireplaces that run along either edge of the clearing. Seven Fireplaces is a central point that connects to trails leading to the North Branch Nature Center, the Hubbard Park Fitness Trail, and the deer park.



Hubbard Park Tower

Begun in 1915 and completed in 1930, the Hubbard Park Tower is located at the highest point of the park, and was the inspiration of the park's original designer. Climb up the stairs for a priceless view of Vermont’s little capital and the mountain ranges beyond. Be sure to wander around the base of the Tower, where fruit and nut trees have been planted to attract wildlife. A picnic table, benches and composting toilet are also near the base of the Tower.